Windows Mobile – the no-go world of Function Keys

Hello

I want to summarize the role of function keys in Windows Mobile, former Pocket PC, as I got several questions each week on how to use or enable Function keys in this or that application.

Here is a simple information about how function keys work in Windows Mobile.

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adsbox adsb receiver antenna rtlsdr gain

As adsbox did take too much CPU from my main server I moved adsbox to a banana pi zero w. Running Raspbian adsbox used about 200% of the 4 cores and 10% of the 512 MB headless system. That was OK for me and I wanted to extend the range of my rtlsdr antenne. I moved the antenna out side and was impressed about the exended range but nearby aircrafts did not show any more 🙁

As I want to see the nearby aircrafts, we are near dĂźsseldorf in the landing lines and wanted the data of the aircrafts crossing the small home village 30km away from the DUS airport.

adsbox missed too much data or the rtlsdr dongle received too much signals. First I changed the adsbox call to use 4 threads for adsb decoding. That did not help.

Then I looked for the gain values to lower the reception signal strength. My rtlsdr RTL8232u supports gain values (found with rtl_test):

#Supported gain values (29): 0.0 0.9 1.4 2.7 3.7 7.7 8.7 12.5 14.4 15.7 16.6 19.7 20.7 22.9 25.4 28.0 29.7 32.8 33.8 36.4 37.2 38.6 40.2 42.1 43.4 43.9 44.5 48.0 49.6

I first started with 0.0 and got better nearby results but only a range of about 5km. Using 25.8 gives a range of 120km but too much airplanes (~39) and nearby losts. With the max gain I had more than 59 airplanes at a time. Finally I used 16.6, which still gives a range of 80km and ~5-10 airplanes.

Using the highest gain would give a very large range of ~250km but nearby signals get lost. And we ant to see mainly the nearby airplanes and now use a gain of 16.6.

The cpu usage is now down to 100% (quad core, so that is 25%) and the adsbox decocde threads are down to 15-25%.

rdesktopce issues

If rdesktopce has issues to connect to a Remote Desktop Server keep in mind that is only supported up to Windows Server 2008. Depending on your settings and the installed or not installed updates, rdesktopce may not be able to connect. I cannot fix this!

If rdesktopce connects to a Windows 2008 R2 server and shows only a desktop with blue background, try the following setting in Remote Desktop Session Host configuration:

Change “Security Layer:” to “Negotiate”

The same setting prevents rdesktopce to connect to a Windows 2012 R2 Server! Currently no solution for this issue.

FHEM: Battery powered Home Automation remote display using small OLED and MQTT

This is the successor of my MQTT remote display. It is battery driven and can so be placed where you want.

The main component is a Pololu U1V11F3, a step up/down converter with 3V3 output and an Enable input pin. Unfortunately the Enable pin is already clamped to Vin via a 100K resistor. For me I had to remove the small SMD resistor to have the circuit powered off normally. The R6/100K is located directly to the Enable in Input connectors of the Pololu board.

The Enable pin is then connected to GND via an 1M resistor to ground. Do not leave the Enable pin floating, it will sense a finger tip already and switch to on/off by accident.

Then I added a momentary switch and a 47K resistor between Vin (the battery Plus) and the Enable pin. If the switch is pressed, the converter starts and gives 3V3 on it’s Output pin. This powers the ESP12 and the OLED display. But only as long as you press the switch. So I added a Diode from GPIO14 of the ESP-12 to the Enable pin.

In the code, GPIO14 is set as output and immediately set to high. This will enable the converter even when the switch is released.

After some code cycles, the GPIO14 output is set to low and the power of the converter is shut down.

The converter will not drain the battery in shutdown mode. But you need to press and hold the switch 2 or 3 seconds until the code powers the Enable pin.

FHEM: Home Automation remote display using small OLED and MQTT

I wanted to have a small display with some essential Home Automation data. So I buy an 1.3″ OLED display with I2C interface and started to look for some existing code for an ESP8266. The display should be feed using WiFi and be portable, so I can place it where needed.

I started with ESPeasy, as there is already support for multiple pages with text lines. Unfortunately the code is written to show sensor data of directly connected sensor only. No option to publish free text or data from a Home Automation system. The ESPeasy code will save the text to flash memory on every change when using the Web GUI. The flash memory would wear out after some month with my use case.

Finally I decided to start my own code. First I had to find out that the OLED display is not an SD1306 but a SH1106 one. Although some people state that these are more or less the same, the SD1306 libraries did not work for me. Then I found https://github.com/ThingPulse/esp8266-oled-ssd1306 which works well for me.

Starting with SSD1306UiDemo.ino I added WiFi and MQTT libaries and code.

My code will show 6 lines of text on two frames (3 lines each). The frames will change every 5 seconds. The content of the text lines is published by a FHEM server. As there was no easy way to integrate the display using a MQTT_DEVICE definition in FHEM, I wrote my own perl mqttmsg sub function and used the FHEM notify definition to publish changes to the display.

a small video

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