Posts tagged ‘function keys’

Mobile Development: rdesktop-ce is now Win2008 R2 compatible

Just a short note: rdesktop-ce is now RDP5 capable and can connect to Win2008 R2 Terminal Services.

With the help of bradh I now have a Windows CE fork of rdesktop that does not show modulo 0x108 error any more when run against windows 2008 R2 server.

Windows Mobile: redirect function keys into Internet Explorer Mobile browser

iHookIE6

this small tool enables you to use Function keys within Internet Explorer Mobile (IEM) web sites.

Normally, most function keys are catched and used by the OS (GWES) to perfom special actions like menu softkeys, phone call, end phone, volume up, volume down and more.

Using a keyboard hook we can catch the function key presses, or better say WM_KEYDOWN and WM_KEYUP messages before the OS can catch them.

One challenge was to find the window that processes normal key presses. The keyboard windows messages are not send to the top level window. Using the Remote Spy Tool I found the Window inside Internet Explorer window that finally processes keyboard messages. Now the tool can hook the keyboard, catch F key presses (F1 to F24) and send them directly to the browser window (class name = “Internet Explorer_Server”). The tool simply uses FindWindow and GetWindow to locate the window handle of this window and then does a PostMessage with WM_KEYDOWN and WM_KEYUP directly to the browser window.

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Windows Mobile: CF how to catch F1 and F2 in WEH

Before WEH and Windows Mobile 6 it was easy to catch all keys including the function keys in a Compact Framework (CF) application, you simply had to use Allkeys(true) and Form.Keypreview=true.

Actually, with Windows Embedded Handheld (WEH) or Windows Mobile 6.5.3 the above will not work for the F1 and F2 key. There are simply no KeyDown and KeyUp events reaching your CF application.

Windows Mobile 6.1 demo

with IMessageFilter active, F1 and F2 can be captured

After removing IMessageFilter no F1 and F2 keys are being captured

With WEH Microsoft moved the Start button from the taskbar at top to the menu bar at bottom. Further on, the menu bar is now using graphic tiles to display the top menu, the Close and OK/Done option. The OK/Close button also moved from taskbar to menu bar. Additionally the menu bar is higher than in Windows Mobile 6.1. That leaves less space for your client window.

Due to the above changes in the UI, the window messages are routed in another unknown way and normally a CF application does not get F1 and F2 key messages. Possibly the CF main message queue gets notification messages but these are handled internally by the CF runtime, you only see the menus are working.

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KeyToggleStart: Yet another usage for keyboard hook

Hello Windows Mobile Users

recently the following was requested:

How can I start an application by just hitting some keys in sequence?

The answer: Just use a keyboard hook.

So I started to code this hook tool based on my KeyToggleBoot2 code. There was not too much to change. The new tool is called KeyToggleStart and it is configured by the registry:

            REGEDIT4

            [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Intermec\KeyToggleStart]
            "ForbiddenKeys"=hex:\
                  72 73 00
            ;max 10 keys!
            "KeySeq"="123"
            "Timeout"=dword:00000003
            "LEDid"=dword:00000001
            "Exe"="\\Windows\\iexplore.exe"
            "Arg"=""

Reg keys meaning:

Forbiddenkeys is just an addon feature: key codes entered in this list will not be processed any more by your Windows Mobile device. For example, to disable the use of the F3(VK_TTALK) and F4 (VK_TEND) keys you have to enter a binary list of 0x72,0x73,0x00 (the zero is needed to terminate the list).

KeySeq list the char sequence you want to use to start an application. For example if this is the string “123”, everytime you enter 123 in sequence within the given time, the application defined will be started.

TimeOut is the time in seconds you have to enter the sequence. So do not use a long key sequence as “starteiexplorenow” and a short timeout (except you are a very fast type writer). The timeout is started with the first char matching and ends after the time or when you enter a non-matching char of the sequence.

With LEDid you can specify a LED index number. LED’s on Windows Mobile are controlled by an index number, each LED has one or more ID assigned to it. So, with LEDid you can control, which LED will lit, when the matching process is running. You can even find an ID to control a vibration motor, if your Windows Mobile device is equipped with one.

The Exe registry string value is used to specify which application will be started when the key sequence is matched.

If the application you want have to be started needs some arguments, you can enter these using the Arg registry value.

When you start the KeyToggleStart tool, you will not see any window except for a notification symbol on your Start/Home screen of the device.

If you tap this icon (redirection sign) you have the chance to end the hook tool.

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